Factbox: Ezzat al-Douri, Saddam's loyal lieutenant, believed killed

Reuters

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Iraq's vice-Chairman of the Revolution Command Council, Ezzat Ibrahim al-Douri, gives an award to President Saddam Hussein (R) in Baghdad in an undated file photo. Iraq's vice-Chairman of the Revolution Command Council, Ezzat Ibrahim al-Douri, gives an award to President Saddam Hussein (R) in Baghdad in an undated file photo.
A prominent former aide to the late Iraqi President Saddam Hussein and a leader of Iraqi insurgents, Ezzat Ibrahim al-Douri, has been killed by Iraqi forces and Shi'ite militias, the governor of Salahuddin province told al-Arabiya television.
The station showed a photo of a dead man who looked like al-Douri. The former lieutenant of Saddam was believed to be mastermind of the insurgency waged by the Islamic State and former Baathist figures against the current Shi'ite-led government.
Baghdad has announced al-Douri's death several times before, but this time photos were circulating showing a man with similar features and red hair like al-Douri's.
Here are some facts about al-Douri.
* He was the senior member of Saddam's regime still at large and ranked six on the U.S. military's list of 55 most-wanted Iraqis, with a $10 million reward offered for his capture.
* After Saddam Hussein was toppled and before al Qaeda and later Islamic State rose to prominence, al-Douri led an insurgency against Baghdad's Shi'ite-led government, organizing and leading major attacks against symbols of the new rule.
* Iraqi Security officials and the U.S. military have said he helped lead the Sunni Arab-led insurgency that erupted after the 2003 invasion. Rumors of his capture have surfaced periodically, but he remained on the run until the report of his death.
* Hailing from the Tikrit region, he helped plot the 1968 coup that brought the Baath party to power. His frail appearance hid a ruthlessness that helped Saddam keep his grip at the top.
* He served as vice-president and deputy chairman of Iraq's powerful Revolutionary Command Council until the 2003 U.S.-led invasion that ousted Saddam.
* He was a senior official responsible for northern Iraq when poison gas was used on Halabja in 1988, killing some 5,000 Kurds. He cut short a visit to Vienna for medical treatment in 1999 to avoid arrest for suspected crimes against humanity.
* Born in 1942, he did not finish high school or do military training, but Saddam made him deputy commander-in-chief of the armed forces with the rank of lieutenant general.

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