Reunification Palace opens 2 more rooms to visitors to Ho Chi Minh City

Thanh Nien News

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The Reunification Palace in Ho Chi Minh City, which was the presidential office and residence of US-backed South Vietnam regime in the Vietnam War, on Thursday opened two more rooms for visitors.
They were the bedroom of Nguyen Van Thieu, who was the president of South Vietnam from 1965 to 1975, and the working room of Nguyen Cao Ky, who served as the prime minister of South Vietnam from 1965 to 1967, then as the vice president from 1967 to 1971.
These two rooms have recently been renovated but the original items have been kept intact, according to the palace’s director Tran Thi Ngoc Diep.
The palace has been the symbolic endgame that brought the Vietnam War to a close on April 30, 1975, when two North Vietnamese Army tanks crashed through its gates.
The palace has three main floors, two entresols, a basement and 100 rooms. It opened for tourists in 1990.
The bedroom of the late president of South Vietnam Nguyen Van Thieu, who lived in the palace from 1967 to 1975. Thieu passed away in Boston, Massachusetts, United States in September 2001 at the age of 79. Photos: Quynh Tran
A corner in the bedroom
The wardrobes of Nguyen Van Thieu's family
The clothes of Nguyen Van Thieu and his wife Nguyen Thi Mai Anh
The shoes of Nguyen Van Thieu and his wife Nguyen Thi Mai Anh
Anh's dressing table 
The bathroom of Nguyen Van Thieu's family
The working room of the late vice president of South Vietnam Nguyen Cao Ky. He died at 80 at a hospital in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, in 2011.
 
The working table of Ky
The reception place of Ky. The woman in the picture is Ky's former wife, Dang Tuyet Mai.

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