Nha Trang to demolish buildings to return beach to public

By Tran Dang - Tran Tam, Thanh Nien News

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High-rise hotels and restaurants along Tran Phu Street have blocked public view and entrance to the sea in Nha Trang. Photo: Tran Dang High-rise hotels and restaurants along Tran Phu Street have blocked public view and entrance to the sea in Nha Trang. Photo: Tran Dang

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Authorities in Nha Trang have announced plans to move or demolish many constructions blocking public entrance and a view of the sea, including a 20,000-sq.m resort that has been open for several years.
The central resort town plans to bring down all constructions including hotels and restaurants along the beachfront side of Tran Phu that runs for kilometers along the beach.
Many of the facilities were built with proper licenses from the Khanh Hoa Province government.
Phan Van De, director of the province’s construction department, said at a meeting last week the demolition would finish by 2018 with all private investors getting due compensation.
State-owned projects would not be compensated, officials said.
The biggest building to go down will be Ana Mandara resort, which stretches over more than 500 meters along the beach.
Khanh Hoa authorities have granted the resort land use rights for until 2022, but its state-owned management company Sovico has agreed to move to a new location in Cam Ranh, around 30 kilometers away.
A guest house belonging to the Ministry of Public Security would also be pulled down, officials said.
Tran Phu now hosts several hotels of more than 30 stories and four more mix developments of between 17 and 50 stories are under construction. It is not clear what will happen to them.
“A couple weeks you don’t go down there and it’s totally different,” Trung, a Nha Trang local, said to describe how fast construction has been popping up along the road.
Huynh Van Son, a lecturer in tourism management , said the clearance would open up the sea to the public and allow Nha Trang to serve tourist demands better.
It is a “costly lesson” for the government’s poor vision of sea-based tourism, he said.
Nha Trang’s environment has taken a hit since the tourism boom began in 1999. In recent years dozens of projects have been licensed along its northern coast.
According to the Institute of Oceanography, the ecology of the 500-square-kilometer Nha Trang Bay has deteriorated rapidly due to tourism-related construction, leaving many native species teetering on the verge of extinction.

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