Int’l connections in Vietnam may fully recover in 3 weeks

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Int’l connections in Vietnam may fully recover in 3 weeks

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Internet users from Vietnam will have troubles with international services for about three more weeks as technicians are still trying to fix what they described as a "short circuit" in a sea cable Thursday.
A source from state-owned telecom giant VNPT said the problem occurred in a segment of the Asia America Gateway cable which connects Vietnam and the US, about 300 kilometers from Vung Tau beach town.
VNPT, which is an investor of the cable, later Thursday corrected a statement it made earlier that the problem had been fixed.
Lam Quoc Cuong, director of VNPT International, told news website VnExpress that technicians from the cable’s management center were expected to reach the spot on April 30 and finish fixing the problem by May 13.
A source from military-run Viettel, another major telecom service provider in the country and investor of the cable, said the fixing will take three to four weeks, depending on weather conditions.
The 20,000-kilometer cable was launched in 2007 as the only cable connecting Southeast Asia with the US. It was linked to Vung Tau in 2009.
Vietnamese Internet users have suffered poor international connections several times as the cable was broken in the same Vung Tau – Hong Kong segment. The latest rupture happened on January 5 and it took three weeks to fix.
Local telecom firms said the problem this time is more complicated.
But they said users would experience less trouble this time as they have prepared more back-up bandwith.
They also have plans to switch to new submarine cables to save users from future problems.
VNPT, Viettel, and another AAG user FPT are investing in the $450-million Asia Pacific Gateway (APG) that runs 10,000 kilometers from Malaysia to South Korea and Japan, with links branching off to Singapore, Thailand, Hong Kong, Taiwan, China, and Vietnam at a point in Da Nang.
The new cable is scheduled to open to service next year.

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