Record-high tide turns parts of Ho Chi Minh City into river

By Mai Vong - Pham Huu, Thanh Nien News

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The tide on the Saigon River rose to 1.68 meters on Friday night, same as the record it set in October last year. Photo: Mai Vong The tide on the Saigon River rose to 1.68 meters on Friday night, same as the record it set in October last year. Photo: Mai Vong

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The tide in Ho Chi Minh City reached its peak of 1.7 meters on Friday night, submerging many streets in the country’s largest metropolis.
The tide on the Dong Dien Canal in Nha Be District surge to 1.7 meters, the highest-ever level,
at 6:30 p.m. on Friday while the tide on the Saigon River rose to 1.68 meters, similar the record it set in October last year, said Nguyen Minh Giam, deputy director of the Southern Region Hydro-meteorology Station.
The tides moved a little lower to 1.62 meters on both the canal and the river early Saturday. But this level was still troubling enough to make residents struggle to go to work and school.
On Huynh Tan Phat Street in District 7, hundreds of workers had to push their broken-down motorcycles in knee-deep water to go the Tan Thuan Export Processing Zone.

Residents push their motorcycles through Huynh Tan Phat Street in District 7 on October 11, 2014. Photo: Pham Huu

“I had to seek permission from the school for absence for my children this morning due to heavy flooding,” said Thanh Tung, a resident of Huynh Tan Phat Street.
Waters flowed into many houses along Ben Phu Dinh Street in District 8. Residents of neighboring streets placed sand bags to prevent waters from flooding their houses.
Parts of districts 2 and 4 as well as Binh Tan and Thu Duc districts were also underwater.

Students go through water to a secondary school in District 2 on October 11, 2014. Photo: Pham Huu

A open-air café near the Saigon River is submerged by the tide on October 11, 2014. Photo: Mai Vong

 

Waters flow into a house in District 8 on October 11, 2014. Photo: Pham Huu

 

A woman holds a boy in her arms as they wade through a flooded street in Thu Duc District on October 11, 2014. Photo: Mai Vong

 

Young people ride their bicycles through a flooded street in District 8 on October 11, 2014.. Photo: Pham Huu

Last April, HCMC mayor Le Hoang Quan warned about worsening flooding in the city due to the impacts of climate change, saying the city can only mitigate damages.
“The Mekong Delta will suffer the most when up to 30 percent of the area is affected by rising sea levels in 2050. Ho Chi Minh City is no exception and nearly 700 square kilometers (270 square miles) will be affected," said Quan.
He said city dwellers will have to “live with floods because it will be impossible to totally solve inundation.”

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