Hanoi adds more traffic cameras to put brake on violations

By Ha An, Thanh Nien News

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Hanoi traffic police officers supervise images sent in by surveillance cameras established around the city. Photo: Nam Anh Hanoi traffic police officers supervise images sent in by surveillance cameras established around the city. Photo: Nam Anh

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Following a pilot project to enforce traffic rules through surveillance cameras that has apparently produced positive results, Hanoi police announced on Thursday that they are going to expand the monitoring system.
Nguyen Thanh Hai, deputy chief of the city’s traffic police department, said police will step up traffic enforcement by using camera images to issue tickets to violators, both on the spot and at a later date. 
Officers who supervise the cameras will inform nearby officers, upon detecting violations, so that violators can be stopped.
Cell phones can now receive images sent from the cameras, Nguyen Van Thinh, a traffic officer, added.
Nguyen Minh Hoang, another deputy chief of the department, also said there will be more patrol teams, mainly to handle violations caught on camera.
First results
Statistics from the traffic department showed that so far 360 cameras have been established at key intersections around Hanoi, including 78 devices specific for catching traffic violations.
All the cameras can take high-definition pictures and can operate well at night and in bad weathers, it said.
They also help police to discover the transport of smuggled and illegal goods, according to Hoang.
Under a plan announced by Hanoi’s authorities last year end, nearly 450 cameras will be established in the city’s downtown this year.
Huynh Tan Nam, a senior officer with the city’s traffic police department, said 99 cases of violations were detected by cameras between January 19 and March 10.
Most of the violations were running red lights and driving on the wrong lane, he said, adding that nearly 98 percent of the violators were car drivers. 
As the cameras recorded violating vehicles’ designs and license plates as well as all information about the time and place of violations, police could identify their drivers and send tickets to them, Nam said.

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