Vietnam, US look to wrap up Pacific trade talks in March

Thanh Nien News

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Vietnam's Prime Minister Nguyen Tan Dung (right) shakes hand with US Ambassador to Vietnam Ted Osius during their meeting in Hanoi on January 7, 2015. Photo credit: VNA Vietnam's Prime Minister Nguyen Tan Dung (right) shakes hand with US Ambassador to Vietnam Ted Osius during their meeting in Hanoi on January 7, 2015. Photo credit: VNA

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The US  hopes to finalize negotiations for the 12-nation Trans-Pacific Partnership in March so the Congress can vote on it two months later, US ambassador to Vietnam Ted Osius said Wednesday during a meeting with Prime Minister Nguyen Tan Dung.
Osius, who began his term in December, told Dung in Hanoi that the US has been more flexible in the US-led TPP negotiations so that the talks can be wrapped up in March for President Barack Obama to submit it to the US Congress for approval in May this year.
“As we look toward the 20th anniversary of normalized relations, we have a unique opportunity to deepen our comprehensive partnership in ways that will make it last,” Osius said during a swearing-in ceremony in Washington last December.
“A successful Trans-Pacific Partnership trade agreement will create jobs and growth in both countries,” he said.
Osius told Dung that the US also looks to become the top investor and the largest trade partner of Vietnam.
The US supported Vietnam’s position on regional security issues, he said, adding that President Obama is making efforts for the full removal of lethal arms sale ban on Vietnam.
Prime Minister Nguyen Tan Dung said that the two nations’ relations have developed in all sectors since they established the diplomatic ties 20 years ago.
He urged both sides to work hard to bolster cooperation in nine areas as specified in their bilateral strategic partnership framework, including economics, trade, and investment.
The PM said he hopes for the exchange of high-level visits this year when Vietnam and the US are to celebrate the 20th anniversary of the normalization of ties.

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