Vietnam recalls N.Korean food supplement citing heavy metals

Thanh Nien News

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A box of Angung Uhwang Hwan, a North Korean food supplement, on display at a showroom in Hanoi and was pulled off the market after being found to contain dangerous levels of heavy metals. Photo: Lien Chau A box of Angung Uhwang Hwan, a North Korean food supplement, on display at a showroom in Hanoi and was pulled off the market after being found to contain dangerous levels of heavy metals. Photo: Lien Chau

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The Vietnam Food Administration (VFA) on Wednesday recalled and destroyed a batch of a North Korean health supplements  after determining that they contained excessive levels of heavy metals.
One day earlier, the Drug Administration of Vietnam (DAV) announced that tests had discovered excessive levels of lead, mercury and arsenic in four samples of Angung Uhwang Hwan – a product advertised as assisting in the treatment of aneurism, strokes, blood pressure issues and heart disease.
The food supplement was produced by Korea Mannyon General Health Corp. and imported to Vietnam by Vietnam Mannyon Trading Co., Ltd, a branch of the North Korean group.
The DAV accidentally took four samples of the product from a Hanoi-based drug showroom, Hong Sam LC Tacy, for testing.
According to test results, the product contains 0.25 milligram of lead per gram, 33.2 mg of mercury per gram and 38.9 mg of arsenic per gram.
The levels are several thousand times higher than the allowed levels for heavy metals in food and pose significant risks to human health, DAV said.
The four samples were among 30 boxes of the product on display at the Hanoi drug showroom. VFA ordered the showroom to recall and destroy its stores of the product.
The Vietnam Mannyon Trading Co., Ltd said it only imported 30 boxes of the product last June to introduce it to the local market.

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