Toxic Chinese jewelry found in Vietnam hub

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Some Chinese-made jewelry products seized from shops for containing toxic chemicals in Ho Chi Minh City / Photo courtesy of Tuoi Tre Newspaper

Ho Chi Minh City authorities have found toxic chemicals in low-cost Chinese-made jewelry products sold in the city and other provinces, Tuoi Tre Newspaper reported Saturday.
The HCMC Market Management Bureau this week released the results of its tests on three samples of polished and plated jewelry styles illegally imported from China.
The tests showed that the products contained lead and cadmium, both harmful for human health.
HCMC authorities have recalled and destroyed tens of thousands of smuggled bracelets and necklaces found tainted with such chemicals over the last few years.
However, the products are still sold rampantly in the city and other provinces because they are cheap and diverse in styles.
On February 18, a team of market management officers launched surprise inspections of three crowded jewelry shops on An Binh Street in District 5.
They found around made-in-China 12,000 bracelet and necklace products, for which the shop owners could not produce the proper import papers. 
The officers confiscated the products for testing. Sample tests showed the products contained lead and cadmium.
The three shops were fined for selling smuggled goods. All the products were destroyed.
According to Vietnamese experts, both lead and cadmium can polish jewelry and prevent rust.
Cadmium is more precious than silver but not as much as gold, they said.
Inhaling cadmium can be dangerous and even fatal as the chemical is considered carcinogenic and harmful to the kidney and bones, according to the experts.

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