Johnson & Johnson donates more than 6,000 helmets to Vietnamese children

By Khanh An, Thanh Nien News

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A primary school student in Dong Nai Province wears a helmet donated by Johnson & Johnson through Asia Injury Prevention Foundation's Helmets for Kids program. Photo: Minh Hung A primary school student in Dong Nai Province wears a helmet donated by Johnson & Johnson through Asia Injury Prevention Foundation's Helmets for Kids program. Photo: Minh Hung

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A total of 6,115 helmets were distributed to 44 primary schools in the provinces of Ha Tinh, Quang Binh, Quang Nam, and Dong Nai under Asia Injury Prevention (AIP) Foundation’s Helmets for Kids program with supports from Johnson & Johnson.
In addition to donating helmets to new students and replacing crash helmets at no cost, parents are eligible to buy subsidized helmets at a half price to replace the damaged ones in the campaign carried out since October 1.
This shows that students’ parents are aware of the importance of quality helmet use and are exhibiting behavior change, according to AIP.
“According to our crash case reports, since early 2015, 25 children in project schools were involved in a crash. With strong commitment from authorities, schools, and parents, the number of children in crashes decreased by more than 50 percent compared to the number recorded in 2014,” said Mirjam Sidik, CEO of AIP Foundation.
Jason Carroll, Managing Director of Johnson & Johnson Vietnam said the helmets will not only protect children on the road, but also serve as a symbol for the traffic law compliance of students and parents.
“We are excited that the helmet use rate among students in Johnson & Johnson project schools increased to over 95 percent. We are proud of contributing to these successful outcomes,” he said.
Helmets for Kids is AIP Foundation’s signature program, launched by former President Bill Clinton in 2000. It provides school children and teachers with quality helmets and road safety education through funding support from numerous individuals, private sectors, and organizations.

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