Vietnam needs to engage private sector in transport planning: World Bank

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Containers transporting coal sit at the dock before being loaded onto a Chinese ship at a port of the Cua Ong Coal Preparation company in Cam Pha town, Vietnam, in this September 21, 2010 file photo. Photo: Reuters/Kham Containers transporting coal sit at the dock before being loaded onto a Chinese ship at a port of the Cua Ong Coal Preparation company in Cam Pha town, Vietnam, in this September 21, 2010 file photo. Photo: Reuters/Kham

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The Vietnamese government needs to work with the private sector in terms of transport and logistics planning and policymaking to improve freight logistics, the World Bank says.
International experience has shown that private sector stakeholders, who are also end-users of transport infrastructure, are well-positioned to inform the authorities on matching supply and demand in transport and logistics, the Washington-based development lender said in a report released on Friday.
In Vietnam, however, private sector stakeholders remain relatively untapped as a source of insight, according to the report.
“By more explicitly, transparently, and predictably engaging with private sector stakeholders all across the import-export and domestic supply chain, national agencies like the Ministry of Transport and sub-national ones like Provincial Departments of Transport can better equip Vietnam with the logistics system it needs as it enters its next phase of logistics competitiveness as a middle-income country,” Luis C. Blancas, a World Bank senior transport specialist and author of the report, said in a statement.
Malaysia, Thailand, the US and the UK -- among the world’s top-performing countries in transport and logistics -- have considerable experience in engaging the private sector.
“Such experience elsewhere provides lessons learned and pitfalls to avoid for Vietnam,” the bank said.
So far, private sector freight stakeholders in Vietnam have worked with the authorities on efforts to facilitate trade, rather than longer-term aspects like infrastructure planning and crafting policies that can promote better service delivery and lower greenhouse gas emissions.

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