Safe and sound: Phu Quoc to host photo exhibit of rescued wildlife

By Minh Hung, Thanh Nien News

Email Print

A photo of Pygmy Loris (Nycticebus pygmaeus) rescued from poachers and having been released to the wild by Wildlife At Risk. Photo credit: Nguyen Vu Khoi/WAR A photo of Pygmy Loris (Nycticebus pygmaeus) rescued from poachers and having been released to the wild by Wildlife At Risk. Photo credit: Nguyen Vu Khoi/WAR

RELATED NEWS

A new photo exhibition opening this month will provide a peek into the life of rescued animals. 
Large-sized photos of over 40 endangered wildlife species will be on display at the Mango Bay Resort on Phu Quoc Island from April 15 to May 15. Featured in the photos are individuals that have been saved by the event’s organizer, conservation advocate NGO Wildlife At Risk (WAR).
The exhibition will not only inspire the audience by beautiful moments of endangered wildlife but also urge them to take part in conservation by saying no to illegal wildlife products, WAR said in a statement.
They show the real beauty of each endangered species such as Asian Leopard, Yellow-cheeked Crested Gibbon, Moon Bear, Green Peafowl, Pangolin, Loris, Hawskbill and Common Pheasant.
The animals used to be victims of illegal poaching, trading or consumption and have been rescued by WAR. Most of them are now living in the forests where they were released while some are being taken care of at WAR’s rescue facilities in Ho Chi Minh City and Kien Giang Province.
“It’s barely possible to see those endangered wildlife in the wild. We are also lucky to not only see those wildlife but help them to be freed,” said WAR CEO Nguyen Vu Khoi, who had taken most of the photos.
“I hope that the audience will not only enjoy the beauty of endangered wildlife but also understand our efforts in wildlife protection. I also hope that each of them will support us so that we can save more endangered wildlife,” he said.
The exhibition will be opened for free from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m.daily.
WAR will sell the photos to raise fund for its rescuing activities.

More Arts & Culture News