3 Vietnamese architectural works win int'l green awards

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A corner of the Flying Bamboo bar at Flamingo Dai Lai Resort in the northern province of Vietnam. The bar, designed by Vo Trong Nghia, has won an international green award

Three Vietnamese architecture works have won the 2012 Green Good Design Awards initiated by the US-based Chicago Athenaeum museum and the European Centre for Architecture Art Design and Urban Studies.

A VnExpress report Wednesday said two of the winning projects were designed by Vo Trong Nghia, who has won numerous prizes for his bamboo-centered designs over the years.

It said one winning design is a 220 square-meter house with green facades and a rooftop garden in Ho Chi Minh City. The design allows the house to receive sunlight and breezes, saving energy while protecting people inside from direct sunlight, noise and pollution coming from the street.

Nghia's second winning entry is the Flying Bamboo bar at the Flamingo Dai Lai Resort in the northern province of Vinh Phuc. The 1,000 square-meter bar is made from bamboo and includes a restaurant and a floating stage.

The other winner is the Hanoi-based 1+1>2 International Architecture Joint-stock Company with a multi-functional community house in the northern province of Hoa Binh, VnExpress said.

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The house was built with local and economical materials like bamboo and stone. It was also designed with energy-saving utilities like a solar cell system and tanks collecting and filtering rainwater.

Started in 2009, the Green Good Design Awards aim to bestow international recognition to outstanding products and works that carry green concepts and raise people's awareness of more sustainable and healthier lifestyles.

The Chicago Athenaeum museum is famous for the annual Good Design Awards founded in 1950 to recognize innovative, sustainable and environmental friendly designs in various fields.

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